Sevastopol imagery 7 June 2022

Another imagery update of Sevastopol provided by Capella, this time dated 7 June 2022.

Not too many changes but there is one strange occurance.

Overall, most of the Russian navy ships remain the same. On the north side of the bay, a couple of civilian merchant vessels were collecting grain/wheat from the terminal. Project 02690 Floating crane SPK-54150 had been operational on the southern side but was back next to the grain terminal at the time of the collection.

The remaining ships are same as those in the 31 May 2022 update – except one Project 1239 Dergach class had departed on 5 June 2022.

On the south side in Pivdenna Bay, very little change. Project 02690 Floating crane SPK-46150 was present but had been operational – to then depart a few days later on 8 June 2022 (more on this later).

The submarine pen was open and one Kilo class SSK was no longer present. This was to be found in the maintenance bay 2 km northeast of Pivdenna, on the south side of Sevastopol Bay.

Even stranger was that, along with the Capella imagery here, others showed the Kilo balancing on the deck of a small floating crane. @GrangerE04117 on Twitter concluded it was Project 877V Alrosa – which I agree with.

The remaining Kilo in Pivdenna Bay was confirmed later on by @Capt_Navy

Alrosa balancing on the deck of the floating crane in such a way is something I haven’t seen before. There are floating docks available, but these are in use. Moreover, potentially this method is a faster way of carrying out the work they need to do on the Kilo. How they got it up on the deck is another question!

SPK-46150 left at 1205 UTC on 8 June 2022, probably for Snake Island. The Floating crane had two Tor-M on its deck. The last position on S-AIS came in at 1422 UTC, northwest of Sevastopol. It appears to be following the same route SPK-54150 took previously, so at 6 knots would take approximately 22 hours from that position to reach Snake Island. A rough ETA would be 1230 UTC on 9 June 2022 if it isn’t there already.

SPK-46150‘s activities prior to departing Sevastopol

The use of the Floating cranes as a Tor-M delivery method to Snake Island is certainly a strange one. I said on a Twitter thread that it may be a “one ship fits all” reasoning, rather than using small landing craft or other vessels that may then need a crane to lift the SAM systems onto the jetty. I can’t see any other reason why they’d do it. Unless there are issues with using the Serna class ships at the ramp at the harbour?

It’s certainly a big risk. As I said on the thread. It’s just an idea as to why they might be using the floating cranes but “I’m not saying they’re correct in their methods“.

Sevastopol Imagery 31 May 2022

An early morning collection by Capella Space of Sevastopol on 31 May 2022 showed that Project 02690 Floating crane SPK-54150 was possibly back at the base. It had recently been spotted at Snake Island in imagery from Maxar and Planet.

It can be confirmed that the crane is certainly not SPK-46150 as this has been operational all day on the south side of Sevastopol bay according to AIS data from FleetMon.

Also present was a single Project 11356M Admiral Grigorovich class FFGH, two Project 1135 Krivak class FFMs and several Project 775 Ropucha class LSTMs.

Two Kilo class SSKs are in the submarine pen, whilst two Project 1239 Dergach class PGGJMs are north side – these are Bora (615) and Samum (616) though identifying which is which is not possible. SPK-46150 was still at its mooring at the time of the pass.

One of the Dergach class was captured on video in the last few days, though again, with no pennant/hull number, it can not be identified.

AIS data from FleetMon shows SPK-46150 has been active on the south side of Sevastopol Bay most of the morning of 31 May 2022

Sevastopol imagery – 15 March 2022


  • Two target ships sought after in imagery
  • Both shown to not be in Sevastopol Bay
  • One turned up a day later

I was keen to know the location of two Russian navy ships that were operating in the vicinity of Sevastopol and the Black Sea region.

The first was Project 1164 Slava-class CGHM Moskva. From satellite imagery available on Sentinel, it was known she had arrived on or around 9 March 2022. She was still present in imagery available from 14 March 2022.

Moskva almost always ties up at the same location so is easy to locate when at the base. In Sentinel SAR imagery (and EO for that matter) you can also measure the length to help assist with the ID.

With the events taking place in the Black Sea, I thought 5 days was quite a long time to be at the base, so it was worth seeing if she was still there on the 15th – Sentinel imagery for that day wasn’t available at the time.

My second target was Project 22160 Bykov-class Corvette Vasily Bykov. If you’ve read my previous blogs, I didn’t believe she had been sunk, and even thought she was elsewhere in the the theatre of operations – possibly the Sea of Azov which I had been monitoring since the alleged “sinking”. This operating area is just a guess though. I’m sure we’ll never really find out.

Moreover, there had been rumours that Vasily Bykov was to always work with Moskva so if one was definitely in Sevastopol, based on the “rumours”, they both should be.

I also had a hunch, that if my guess about being elsewhere was correct, then maybe Vasily Bykov could have arrived anyway, regardless of being with Moskva or not. Having been out the same length of time, she must have needed resupplying as much as Moskva did.

I requested an image collection from Capella on the morning of 15 March 2022, and was lucky enough to get a pass that evening at 1826z, about seven hours after the request had gone in.

This revealed that both Moskva had departed, and that Vasily Bykov was not in.

Whilst this might be looked upon as negative, it isn’t. Intel is Intel. It was now known that Moskva was on her way somewhere and had been stocked up – as it turns out in imagery available later in Sentinel, to take part in operations east of Odessa.

It also showed that Vasily Bykov wasn’t operating with Moskva as per the rumours.

And, low and behold on 16 March 2022, Vasily Bykov did turn up at Sevastopol. A miracle one would say, bearing in mind it was supposed to have been sunk a few weeks earlier.

It wasn’t a bad guess she’d turn up – just 24 hours later than my hunch.

The Capella imagery also showed that there wasn’t much else in the bay. The southern area was empty bar one Kilo-class SSK.

The area next to Moskva‘s normal home was also pretty empty. Just one possible Project 1135M Krivak II-class FFM was present. The imagery for this is a little blurred due to the angle of the collection (44 degrees) and the sweep of the SAR itself. This places the ship almost on its side, but the profile does look like a Krivak-II.

If not, it is a Project 11356M Grigorovich-class FFGH – they are the same length, though the profile is slightly different due to the heli-deck.

This doesn’t appear to have the heli-deck and looks to be stepped down to the stern for accommodate the two AK-100 guns.

Regardless, the imagery from Capella was well timed. Whilst the areas out at sea were clear, over Sevastopol itself it was cloudy so EO wasn’t usable – Sentinel didn’t have any EO passes there anyway – and the Sentinel SAR is nowhere near as good as Capella’s.

Unfortunately, I have no collections available to me over Sevastopol today (16 March 2022) so I can’t see Vasily Bykov, and it looks like other ships are also returning – with Project 775 Ropucha-class LST Kondopoga reported to have arrived too.

Vasily Bykov – the end (of the fake news)


I’m not going to beat around the bush on this one.

It was totally obvious in the first place – Vasily Bykov has turned up in Sevastopol on 16 March 2022 without a scratch!

I’m just going to say one thing.

Don’t bother with OSINT – or any other type of reporting/Intelligence – if you don’t have a clue about what you’re doing!

You can be wrong if it’s a tight thing to work out – as I was with the ID of the actual ship on fire – but the bloody evidence was there! It wasn’t a warship of any type on fire – it was a merchant ship.

And yet, the idiots still don’t believe it!!

I fear for the world we live in!!

Update on “False news on Vasily Bykov”


  • Update on likely ship on fire wrongly identified as Vasily Bykov
  • Location of Vasily Bykov still not confirmed

Whilst the location of Russian Navy Project 22160 Corvette Vasily Bykov is still not known, further analysis of imagery and video shows that my first assessment of the ship on fire being old imagery of Estonian flagged merchant ship Helt is likely incorrect too.

With Moldavian flagged chemical tanker Millennial Spirit somehow still being afloat since it was hit by a Russian missile on 25 February 2022, this is more likely to be the ship wrongly ID’d as Vasily Bykov.

By comparing the image below with that shown in social media, one can clearly see the structures at the bow of Millennial Spirit match exactly. You can also clearly see the red colour of the ship in the video.

Vasily Bykov definitely isn’t red in colour!

Millennial Spirit in its previous guise as Freyja in 2016

Satellite imagery from Sentinel collected on 13 March 2022 shows that Millennial Spirit is still smouldering from fires. She is currently located at 46.36707 31.11753.

FleetMon AIS data below shows the last 12 days of Millennial Spirit before the transmissions ceased. You’ll see that they are not far from those last reported by Helt.

The hunt for Vasily Bykov continues. I even wonder if the ship is still in this area. Time will tell.

Roland Proesch Radio Monitoring books 2017

Roland Proesch has announced that his latest books on Radio monitoring are now available at his website

Whilst Signal Analysis for Radio Monitoring remains a 2015 edition, the other three – Technical Handbook for Radio Monitoring HF, Technical Handbook for Radio Monitoring VHF/UHF and Frequency Handbook for Radio Monitoring HF – have all been updated to 2017.

There is also a new title – Technical Handbook for Satellite Monitoring – which is over 400 pages long and is aimed at those that are interested in satellite communication. The book is the usual high standard with figures and tables on satellite systems and the waveforms they use.

Because of the new title, all satellite information (nearly 100 pages) has been removed from the VHF/UHF book, but these have been replaced by new modes such as Radar, C4FM, DVB-T etc.

At the moment, there are no PDF examples available, but going to my previous blog at the last release can provide that information for now. I’ll update when they do become available.

I highly recommend these books and they are very well priced at 49Euros each plus postage. There’s also the usual bundle price discount if you want more than one – further information on the website.

But, if you don’t want to pay the postage and are heading to the HAM RADIO 2017 exhibition in Friedrichshafen, Germany on the 14 – 16th July, then Roland will have a stand there (A1-213). I’m sure he’ll be pleased to see you there – I wish I could attend, but I’ll probably have to wait the 5 years or so until I move to Bavaria myself.

The opening times and price list for tickets to the exhibition can be found here